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    Military-use structures

    ARLINGTON LINE Map

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    Wilson Boulevard at North Courthouse Road

    Here the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861, crossed the Georgetown-Falls Church road. 100 yards to the northwest stood Fort Morton, a lunette with a perimeter of 250 yards and emplacements for 17 guns; 100 yards to the southeast stood Fort Woodbury, a lunette with a perimeter of 275 yards and emplacements for 13 guns.

    BATTERY GARESCHE Map

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    Abingdon Street at South 30th Road

    Here stood Battery Garesche, constructed late in 1861 to control the higher ground dominating Fort Reynolds, 200 yards to the southeast. It had a perimeter of 166 yards and emplacements for 8 guns.

    CONFEDERATE OUTPOST Map

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    Wilson Boulevard at North Manchester Street

    In August 1861, while U.S. forces were constructing the Arlington Line three miles to the east, the Confederates established a fortified outpost on the high ground about 200 yards west of here, to guard the bridge by which the Georgetown-Falls Church road crossed Four Mile Run. In October they withdrew to Fairfax Court House. The Federals then established a signal station at the top of the hill and constructed Fort Ramsay just across the County line.

    Ft. Albany marker, Sept. 15, 2001

    FORT ALBANY Map

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    Junction of South Arlington Ridge Road and South Nash Street

    Immediately to the northwest stood Fort Albany, a bastioned earthwork built in May, 1861, to command the approach to the Long Bridge by way of the Columbia Turnpike. It had a perimeter of 429 yards and emplacements for 12 guns. Even after Forts Richardson and Craig were built, 1300 yards to the west and north respectively, the heavy guns of Fort Albany served to support them, and to dominate them if they were captured. The ground on which the Fort stood was cut away during the construction of the Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway, in 1942.


    View from Ft. Albany marker toward the Pentagon, Sept. 15, 2001

    FORT ETHAN ALLEN Map

    3829 North Stafford Street

    This embankment was the south face of Fort Ethan Allen, a bàstioned earthwork built in September 1861, to command all the approaches to Chain Bridge south of Pimmit Run. The Fort had a perimeter of 736 yards, with emplacements for 39 guns. The embankments which still remain were the south face, less the west bastion; an interior bombproof shelter for protection against artillery fire from Hall’s Hill; the magazine and guardhouse near the north face; and a part of the east face.

    FORT BARNARD Map

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    South Pollard Street and Walter Reed Drive at the Fort Barnard Recreation Center

    Here stood Fort Barnard, a redoubt constructed late in 1861 to command the approaches to Alexandria by way of Four Mile Run and Glebe Road. It was named for General J. G. Barnard, Chief Engineer of the Defenses of Washington. It had a perimeter of 250 yards and emplacements for 20 guns.

    FORT BENNETT Map

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    1600 block of North 22nd Street

    Here stood Fort Bennett, a small outwork of Fort Corcoran, constructed in May 1861. With a perimeter of 146 yards and emplacements for 5 guns, it was designed to bring under fire the slope northwest of Fort Corcoran, which could not be seen from there.

    FORT BERRY Map

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    Glebe Road at South 17th Street and Walter Reed Drive

    Immediately to the west stood Fort Berry, a redoubt constructed in 1863 at the north flank of the defenses of Alexandria, but also flanking the Columbia Turnpike and the Arlington Line constructed in 1861. It had a perimeter of 215 yards and emplacements for 10 guns.

    FORT CASS Map

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    Arlington Boulevard at North 10th Street (near the Ft. Myer horse paddock)

    Just to the south stood Fort Cass, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 288 yards and emplacements for 13 guns.

    FORT CRAIG Map

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    South Courthouse Road at South 4th Street

    Here stood Fort Craig, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 324 yards and emplacements for 11 guns.

    FORT CORCORAN Map

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    Key Boulevard at North Ode Street

    Here beside the Georgetown-Falls Church road stood Fort Corcoran, a bastioned earthwork built in May 1861 to command all the approaches to the Aqueduct Bridge. It had a perimeter of 576 yards and emplacements for 10 guns. It was dominated by the higher ground to the west and was relegated to a supporting role when the Arlington Line was built 1000 yards farther west in August 1861.

    FORT HAGGERTY Map

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    Wilson Boulevard at North Arlington Ridge Road

    Here beside the Georgetown-Alexandria road stood Fort Haggerty, a small outwork of Fort Corcoran, constructed in May 1861. With a perimeter of 128 yards and emplacements for 4 guns, it was designed to bring under fire the slope south of Fort Corcoran, which could not be seen from there.

    FORT MYER HISTORIC DISTRICT Map

    Arlington Boulevard (US Rt. 50) at North Pershing Drive

    This fort is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    FORT REYNOLDS Map

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    Fort Reynolds Park, South 31st Street, east of South Woodrow Street

    Here stood Fort Reynolds, a redoubt constructed in September 1861, to command the approach to Alexandria by way of the valley of Four Mile Run. It. had a perimeter of 360 yards and emplacements for 12 guns.

    FORT RICHARDSON Map

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    South 18th Street off Glebe Road

    Here is what is left of Fort Richardson, a detached redoubt constructed in September 1861 to cover the left flank of the newly built Arlington defense line, It was named for General Israel B. Richardson, whose division was then deployed to defend against attack by way of Columbia Turnpike. It had a perimeter of 316 yards and emplacements for 15 guns.

    FORT RUNYON Map

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    Boundary Channel Drive at Old Jefferson Davis Highway

    A half-mile to the southwest stood Fort Runyon, a large bastioned earthwork constructed in May 1861 to protect the Long Bridge over the Potomac. Its perimeter, 1,484 yards, was about the same as that of the Pentagon. After the construction of the Arlington Line two miles to the west, Fort Runyon fell into disuse. Nearby Fort Jackson, at the Virginia end of the Long Bridge, was no more than a checkpoint to control traffic on the bridge and protect it from sabotage.

    View from Ft. Scott toward the Potomac

    FORT SCOTT Map

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    Fort Scott Drive entrance to the Fort Scott Recreation Area

    Here stood a detached lunette constructed in May 1861 to guard the south flank of the defenses of Washington and named for General Winfield Scott, then General-in-Chief of the Army. It was subsequently relegated to an interior position by the construction of the defenses of Alexandria about 1/4 miles to the west. The Fort had a perimeter of 313 yards and emplacements for 8 guns. A remnant portion may be found immediately to the west.

    FORT C. F. SMITH HISTORIC DISTRICT Map

    Near 2411 North 24th Street

    Just to the north are the remains of Fort C. F. Smith, a lunette built early in 1863 to command the high ground north of Spout Run and protect the flank of the Arlington Line. It had a perimeter of 368 yards and emplacements for 22 guns.

    This district is a designated Arlington County Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    FORT STRONG Map

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    Lee Highway at North Adams Street

    Nearby to the north stood Fort Strong, a lunette marking the north end of the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 318 yards and emplacements for 15 guns.

    FORT TILLINGHAST Map

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    Arlington Boulevard at North 2nd Street

    Here stood Fort Tillinghast, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 298 yards and emplacements for 13 guns. A model of this fort, typical of all lunettes in the Arlington Line, can be seen at the Hume School museum of the Arlington Historical Society.

    FORT WHIPPLE Map

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    Arlington Boulevard at Pershing Drive, near entrance to Fort Myer

    On the high ground to the northeast stood Fort Whipple, a bastioned earthwork built early in 1863 to support the Arlington Line built in 1861. It had a perimeter of 640 yards and emplacements for 47 guns. After the War, Fort Whipple was maintained as a permanent military post. In 1880 the name was changed to Fort Myer In honor of General Albert J. Myer, former post commander and first Chief Signal Officer of the United States Army.

    FORT WOODBURY Map

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    North Courthouse Road at North 14th Street

    Immediately behind the present Court House stood Fort Woodbury, a Iunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 275 yards and 19 emplacements for 13 guns. It was named for Major D.P. Woodbury, the Engineer who designed and constructed the Arlington Line.

    MINOR’S HILL Map

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    Williamsburg Boulevard at North Powhatan Street

    To the northwest is Minor’s Hill, so called for George Minor who lived on the far side at the time of the Revolution. It is the highest elevation in the County. In the fall of 1861 it was the site of a Confederate outpost. Afterwards there was a Federal signal station at the top of the hill. Here at the foot of the hill was a large cantonment housing the reserve force supporting the Federal outposts in Fairfax County.

    PENTAGON OFFICE BUILDING COMPLEX Map

    Jefferson Davis Highway/Virginia Rt. 110

    This building listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    View from the Pentagon to Washington over the Potomac

    QUARTERS 1, FORT MYER Map

    Grant Avenue on Ft. Myer (Arlington Boulevard/US Rt. 50 at North Pershing Drive)

    This building listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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